Cindy Koepp

Writing on the Edge

Other People Say...

Victoria Adams

Author of Who I Am Yesterday

Review on Victoria's Reading Alcove


Mary Campagna Findley

Author of Benny and the Bank Robber, Chasing the Texas Wind, Send a White Rose, and The Baron's Ring

How far will a father go to rescue his daughter, and how much power does he really have to bring that about? How hard will a soldier push herself to do her duty when doing it has already cost her health, friendship and maybe her future? What will it take to bring together two races desperately in need of each other? Most members don't even try to hide their disdain and disgust for each other. You have no idea how richly complex the answers to these questions are and how much you need to find them out by reading this book.


Sora is taking his place among my all-time favorite characters. He's a typical father, keeping his children's colorful drawings close to his heart. He's everybody's wise and patient friend, even those who tell him to "butt out." But even the Pilgrim in Bunyan's timeless allegory might not have tried to carry as big a burden of guilt as Sora does. His patience and open-heartedness create an unexpected opportunity for the expression of the author's Christian faith.


Some people might object to the inclusion of multiple intelligent races but Koepp makes it work for me. It's easy to take a somewhat allegorical view of certain beings. It's clear that the message of the book is to give God the glory for good decisions, victories and even happy reunions.


The Numodynes are more than a little puzzling. But they are an important picture of how good and evil can look a lot alike. Even when you make the effort to figure out which is which, they can still both have a powerful effect on you and your plans. It's good thing God is there to help with the understanding and the response.

 

Precarious Yates

Author of Elite of the Weak and The Captives (The Heart of the Caveat Whale)

Although it took me a little while to get into the story and understand what was happening, I had no disappointment once I did. In addition, the characters were so likable, I read what I didn't grasp on the sheer quality of these characters.


Koepp draws you into her characters right away, and I felt for them even while trying to understand their circumstances. Then when the story unfolded, I was so excited by the twists and turns of the rescue mission that I was riveted, unable to put the story down!

Kirsten, one of the main characters, inspired me from the get-go. She’s strong, savvy, witty and empathetic at all the right times. Sora was another who intrigued me from the moment I encountered him on the page. One of my favorite quotes from the book was about him, “Aolanians were weird enough, but that particular one took odd to a whole new galaxy.”

This is such a visual book, and I appreciated every shape and color Koepp introduced to my mind. No scene lacked the array of visuals, from the first page to the last.

 

Aaron DeMott

I really enjoyed reading Remnant in the Stars. It's one of those books that reminds me why I like science fiction. The book is set in a future universe with spaceships, aliens, and bad guys, and it has a wonderful sense of adventure.


The story is primarily about Sora, an self-outcast alien who's daughter has gone missing, but it has a great ensemble cast whose characters are all fleshed out (naturally, some get more character development than others, but there's a nice balance.)


The rest of the cast of main characters include Kirsten, a pilot who's having trouble with her replacement arm; Peter, the ex-military gunner; Derek, the freelance captain who's always dreamed of having his own ship; Janice, the engineer with a love for puns; and Vince the doctor.


The book feels similar to a combination of Han Solo (and Chewie and the Falcon) and Cowboy Bebop, with a storyline that's serious but still humorous at the same time.


I love it, and want more in the series!

photo credit: pedrosimoes7 via photopin cc